Abandoned Buildings Dilemma




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Wanted American Made Renewable Energy Producing Systems Product Information

I am starting a Promotion that will Highlight:

Building a Green America

If your organization is interested in Sharing Green and Eco Friendly Product information for People to gain greater understanding of Green and Eco Friendly Alternatives that will help reduce Climate Change, encourage American Job Growth, and Promote American Products Send Your Information for Publication by using the contact form below

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Re: Wanted American Made Renewable Energy Producing Systems Product Information

 I am starting a Promotion that will Highlight: 

Building a Green America
  • American Made Renewable Energy Producing Systems for American Homes and Business 

If your organization is interested in Sharing Green and Eco Friendly Product information for People to gain greater understanding of Green and Eco Friendly Alternatives that will help reduce Climate Change, encourage American Job Growth, and Promote American Products  Send Your Information for Publication scotty@stlouisrenewableenergy.com.

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Build Green, Scotty

Scott’s Contracting
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http://scottscontracting.wordpress.com/
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http://www.stlouisrenewableenergy.com
scotty@stlouisrenewableenergy.com

Wanted American Made Renewable Energy Producing Systems Product Information

 I am starting a Promotion that will Highlight: 

Building a Green America
  • American Made Renewable Energy Producing Systems for American Homes and Business 

If your organization is interested in Sharing Green and Eco Friendly Product information for People to gain greater understanding of Green and Eco Friendly Alternatives that will help reduce Climate Change, encourage American Job Growth, and Promote American Products  Send Your Information for Publication scotty@stlouisrenewableenergy.com.

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Together we can Build a Green America.

Build Green, Scotty
Scott's Contracting
scottscontracting@gmail.com
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scotty@stlouisrenewableenergy.com

10 Best Regional Foods in America-Missouri Beef

10 Best Regional Foods in America

No matter how you slice it, food can tell you a lot about a place.

By Kate Hamman, SmarterTravel.com Staff

Lobster roll in Maine
Lobster roll, the pride of Maine Photo: why_style

More from SmarterTravel.com

More from Yahoo! Travel

The U.S. boasts an array of regional culinary creations that offer insight into the history, climate, and culture of the place. Though there are way too many to list, here are 10 different foods that are sure to whet your appetite, from po-boy sandwiches to key lime pie.

Lobster Roll
Maine

Its origins may be a bit unclear, but there’s no denying that Maine and lobster rolls are a match made in seafood heaven—it is the official state sandwich, afterall. New Englanders take pride in the hefty chunks of chilled cooked lobster meat lightly tossed with mayonnaise and served on a toasted hot dog bun. Though there are many twists on the recipe, including warm butter in place of the mayo or the addition of celery and a plethora of spices, true purists prefer their lobster rolls to be pretty bare bones.

Visitors can find this extravagant, yet humble, sandwich served at almost every restaurant in Maine, but there are a few places that bring it to new heights, including Shaw’s Fish & Lobster Wharf in New Harbor, Bagaduce Lunch in Brooksville, and Waterman’s Beach Lobster in South Thomaston, among many others.

Sourdough bread from San Francisco
Sourdough bread, San Francisco’s specialtyhepp

Sourdough Bread
San Francisco

The history of sourdough bread is closely related to the men who came to San Francisco in 1849 in pursuit of gold. These 49ers would buy bread "starters," a fermented mixture of yeast, water, and flour, to bake fresh loaves on the trail, but discovered a sour flavor to the bread unlike anywhere else in the world. It’s because San Francisco’s climate produces wild microorganisms unique to the area, giving the bread its tangy bite. Seasoned miners even came to be known as "sourdoughs" for their time spent fermenting in the mines.

Meanwhile, a French baker by the name of Isidore Boudin struck culinary gold when he combined the sourdough starters with French baking techniques. The finished product was a loaf of bread, crusty on the outside and light and airy with a bit of a tart kick on the inside. Sourdough bread is now sold all over the city, but you can still buy it from the bakery that started it all, the Boudin Bakery.

Po-boy sandwiches that come from New Orleans
The po-boy sandwich originated in New OrleansPrince Roy

Po-boy Sandwich
New Orleans

Though there are many competing tales of when the po-boy was created, most people believe that the sandwich came to be during the streetcar driver strike in the 1920s, when restaurant owners, Clovis and Benjamin Martin invented the cheap eat to support the strike and feed the unemployed streetcar drivers. When a worker would approach the rear of the restaurant to purchase a sandwich, the kitchen staff would yell out, "Here comes another poor boy!" Eventually, the name stuck.

The original po-boy was made using French bread, leftover bits of beef, and gravy, but there are many different versions today, including the popular shrimp po-boy, made with deep fried Gulf shrimp, lettuce, tomatoes, and hot sauce. Po-boys are sold in restaurants all over the Big Easy, but it’s hard to beat Johnny’s Po-Boys, which has been serving the affordable sandwich for more than 50 years.

New York's famous bagels
New York’s famous bagelsTheodore Scott

Bagels
New York City

Bagels may not have been invented in New York City, but they’re as much a part of its culture as the Empire State Building. The recipe for the doughnut-shaped rolls came to the Big Apple in the 1880s, with the arrival of thousands of Eastern-European Jewish immigrants. In fact, so many individual bagel shops cropped up during this time that it became necessary to establish an International Bagel Bakers Union.

The New York-style bagel is made with salt and malt, and boiled before it’s baked. The end result is a large doughy crust surrounding a fluffy and chewy interior. There is also great debate among New Yorkers on whether a fresh bagel should be toasted or not. Two of the more famous bagel spots are H&H and Ess-a-Bagel, but there are so many lesser-known places waiting to be discovered.

Key lime pie, the official desert of Florida
Key lime pie, the official desert of FloridaLee Coursey

Key Lime Pie
Key West

As the story goes, fresh milk wasn’t so easy to come by before the railroad came to Key West in 1912, making it very difficult to create custard pies. However, the invention of Borden’s sweetened condensed milk in 1859 put desserts back on the kitchen table, and eventually led to the invention of the official state dessert for Florida. No one is quite certain who made the first key lime pie, but there’s no denying that the combination of condensed milk, local key lime juice, egg yolks, and sugar poured over a graham cracker crust put this southern Florida town on the food map.

Many pie lovers today are torn between pastry or graham cracker crust and whipped cream or meringue topping. Almost every restaurant on the island offers a variation of the tangy treat, but there are a few places that are noted for making the best Key Lime Pie, including Blue Heaven, Kermit’s Key West Key Lime Shoppe, and the Blond Giraffe.

Philly cheese steak
Nothing says Philly like a cheese steak why_style

Philly Cheese Steak
Philadelphia

The Philly cheese steak, with its long crusty roll, filled to the brim with grilled, thinly sliced rib eye steak and smothered in neon orange Cheez Wiz, is as much of a Philadelphia icon as the Liberty Bell. There are several variations on the original sandwich, including provolone instead of Cheez Whiz, the addition of onions and green peppers, and thicker cuts of meat versus the shaved steak.

The mouthwatering mixture of cheese and beef was discovered in 1930 by Pat Olivieri, founder of Pat’s King of Steaks, while making hot dogs. And though there’s plenty of dispute over which of the city’s restaurants reign supreme, Pat’s and Geno’s Steaks, located directly across the street from one another, are part of one of the greatest rivalries in food history.

Deep-dish pizza in Chicago
Chicago lays claim to deep-dish pizzamaveric

Deep Dish Pizza
Chicago

One thing is for certain about the history of Chicago pizza: In 1943, a restaurant started selling a new item under the name, "Deep Dish Pizza," and the city’s food scene was never the same again. There is some debate over who was the genius behind the tasty variation on traditional pies, but the true identity remains a mystery. The creator may never be found, but his pizza, with layers of ingredients stacked like a casserole and finished with sauce on top, will live on forever.

The first thick pie was served in a restaurant on East Ohio Street by the name of The Pizzeria, which soon became Pizzeria Uno. The restaurant is still there today, but you can find a slice of deep dish on almost every street corner in the Windy City.

Barbecue
Barbecue styles differ with the region stevendepolo

Barbecue
North Carolina, Memphis, Kansas City, Texas

Barbecue is serious business, and a surefire way to start a food fight is to claim that one region does it better than the next. Memphis, North Carolina, Kansas City, and Texas each represent a different style of barbecue: Memphis is known for its pulled pork shoulder slathered in a sweet tomato sauce and served with or without a bun; Kansas City revels in dry-rubbed ribs; Texas loves all things meat, from mesquite-grilled brisket to pulled pork; and North Carolina is all about the whole hog, smoked in a vinegar-based sauce.

A misconception about barbecue is that it’s dependant on grilling. In fact, most would agree that it requires a great deal of skill and time to slow roast pork or beef until the meat nearly falls off the bone, and almost every great barbecue master has a special method or technique to get it just right. This accounts for why there are so many different flavors and varieties of barbecue, and why each is tasty in its own right.

Maryland crab cakes
Maryland crab cakes probably originated in EnglandSheriW

Crab Cakes
Maryland

The idea behind crab cakes can be traced back to ancient times when seafood was scarce, and the best way to make the most out of the valuable commodity was by combining it with other ingredients in a patty. It’s then believed that crab cake-style recipes were brought to the U.S. by English settlers during the colonial period, when Maryland locals used crabs native to the area to make the now famous crab cakes.

Basic Maryland, or Baltimore, crab cakes are typically made using fresh blue crab, bread crumbs, Worcestershire sauce, and a few binding ingredients before being formed into a patty and fried in butter. However, there are a plethora of variations on this simple recipe found all over the state, ranging from recipes served at upscale restaurants to sandwich shops.

Cheese curds from Wisconsin
Wisconsin loves its cheese curdsSheriW

Cheese Curds
Wisconsin

Since Wisconsin is fondly referred to as the Cheese State, it seemed only fitting to highlight one of its greatest culinary commodities, the cheese curd. These peanut-sized snacks are created during the cheese making process when the milk curdles and before the cheese is processed into blocks. Fresh curds are rubbery in texture, salty to taste, and "squeak" when you bite them, hence the nickname, "squeaky cheese." Curds that sit out too long lose their noise and become a bit dry.

Cheese curds come in a variety of different flavors these days, including dill, jalapeno, and bacon, but it’s hard to beat the classic yellow cheddar curd. Farms, gas stations, and grocery stores all over the state sell the noisy treat, but Mars’ Cheese Castle in Kenosha is one of the more popular places to get them.

(Editor’s Note: SmarterTravel.com is a member of the TripAdvisor Media Network, an operating company of Expedia, Inc. Expedia, Inc. also owns Expedia.com and Hotwire.)

10 Amazing Homes-Local Festus MO Home Included #4

10 Amazing Homes You Won't Find In Your Neighborhood

By Diane Tuman, Content Manager , Zillow.com
Sep 9, 2010

If you consider yourself a non-conformist, or one who shuns traditional ways of doing things, then here is a perfect lineup of nontraditional homes that should fit your spirit perfectly. Take your pick from a church, an old firehouse, an earthship home, a geodesic home, a floating home, and even a decommissioned missile site. Plus, some of these homes are for sale!

Old Firehouse - 117 Broad St, San Francisco, CA
Old Firehouse

1. Old Firehouse – 117 Broad St, San Francisco, CA 94112
Status: For Sale – $975,000

San Francisco's Firehouse 33 was in the business of fighting fires from 1896 to 1974. Up until 1921, it had two horses, a steamer, a Dalmatian and a rotating crew of firefighters. When bigger fire engines were built in the 1970s, Firehouse 33's doors could not accommodate the wider girth and so, the original Firehouse 33 became obsolete and a new Firehouse 33 was built around the corner. An entrepreneurial couple bought this firehouse and turned it into a home/business – the "San Francisco Fire Engine Tours & Adventures" business. It has two beds, two baths and 4,000 sq ft of space, plus interesting amenities such as the original redwood lockers the firemen used, lots of closet space, a garage that can fit six cars (and a firetruck, if you had one) and of course, a fire pole!

Old Church, 601 Dolores St, San Francisco, CA
Old Church

2. Old Church – 601 Dolores St, San Francisco, CA 94110
Status: For Sale – $7,490,000

Yes, here we are in San Francisco again (surprised?) where we find a fabulously restored Gothic Revival home that was formerly a church. At 17,000 sq ft, it is said to be one of the largest single family homes in San Francisco. The living room features a soaring, coffered, hand-painted ceiling with seven enormous chandeliers, stained glass windows (naturally) and arched windows looking out to Dolores Park. Climb to the tower meditation room and deck for a 360-degree view of the city.

Round House- 122 Olmstead Hill Rd, Wilton, CT
Round House

3. Round House- 122 Olmstead Hill Rd, Wilton, CT 06897
Status: Presently off the market

Known as the "Connecticut Round House," this unique property has been listed for sale a couple times before being recently removed with a list price of $1,750,000 (it was listed in 2008 for $2.3 million). Designed by architect Richard T. Foster, it is a cylindrical masterpiece that sits 12 feet off the ground on its "base" and has the ability to rotate slowly 360 degrees, taking in the nearly four acres of land and a pond. It takes about 50 minutes to complete an entire rotation and can be stopped, slowed down or speeded up. Made of steel, glass and shingles, the 3,000 sq ft home was renovated in 2005 and is completely walled in glass. It features custom ash cabinetry, state-of-the-art Xenon interior lighting, marble and limestone bath finishes, and "Smart House" technology in the main house." Plus, there is a separate guest house and in-ground lap pool.

Cave house - 1101 N 11th St, Festus, MO
Cave House, (Photo courtesy Caveland.us)

4. Cave house – 1101 N 11th St, Festus, MO 63028
Status: Presently off the market

The "Cave House" was on the market in a distress sale in 2009, but it appears the owners were able to re-work their adjustable-rate loan and have now happily settled back into cave life. The 17,000 square foot house – er, cave – is in Festus, MO, and has three chambers: a front chamber that contains three bedrooms; a middle chamber that holds the laundry room, storage, and a spare bath, and the back chamber that still has the stage where Ted Nugent, Bob Seger, Ike and Tina Turner, and many other entertainers performed. Obviously, the owners of this cave are very well connected. No furnace or air-conditioning needed; geothermal and passive solar systems keep the home comfortable year-round.

Earthship - 6 High Meadow Dr,Taos, NM
Earthship

5. Earthship – 6 High Meadow Dr, Taos, NM 87571
Status: For Sale – $265,000

That's right – you won't find this "earthship" in a well-manicured cul-de-sac in most regions of the U.S., but your chances are much greater in New Mexico or Arizona. Called "Sol Ship," this one-bed, one-bath earthship is designed for off-the-grid living and uses passive solar thermomass construction that heats and cools the interior. But don't worry – you can tap into traditional systems if you have a craving for microwave popcorn. Many earthships are a little rough around the edges with recycled materials visibly poking out (tires, cans, bottles) but this is a higher-end earthship with an indoor koi pond and hand-plastered walls with whimsical sculpted displays around the fireplace and walls. Two underground, 3,000-gallon cisterns hold water. Own this home and no one will insult you about your carbon footprint, because it doesn't exist.

Geodesic home -  2643 Birch Ave, Batavia, IA
Geodesic home

6. Geodesic home – 2643 Birch Ave, Batavia, IA 52533
Status: No longer on the market

Geodesic dome homes rode a wave of popularity in the 1960s and 70s, but their construction is now limited due to challenges in code requirements. While the exterior is round, the interior of geodesic homes contain many angles – just try to find a wall in which to hang a photo, or a long flat wall to position the couch. This four-bed, 3.5-bath dome home sits on 20 acres.

t
Floating home

7. Floating home – 2466 Westlake Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109
Status: For Sale – $975,000

No, Tom Hanks does not live here and this is not the Sleepless in Seattle floating home, but this is a quintessential floating home on Seattle's Lake Union and better yet – it's never been lived in. The shingled-style master craftsman design offers two bedrooms and one bath.

Old Barn - 9424 Windsong Loop NE, Bainbridge Island, WA 98110
Old barn

8. Old Barn – 9424 Windsong Loop NE, Bainbridge Island, WA 98110
Status: Recently sold – $542,000

This Bainbridge Island, WA barn was built 104 years ago and was used as a dairy farm before being converted into a home. It retains its barn shape with soaring, cathedral ceilings with exposed beams and rough-hewn floors. Rolling barn doors serve as shutters to two bedrooms and one original wall reveals the original penciled shopping list that includes 2,100 pounds of seeds. Sixteen windows in the open living area draw passive solar heat and natural light.

Shoe House - 197 Shoe House Rd, Hellam, PA
Shoe House(Photo courtesy Cool High Quality Pix)

,

9. Shoe House – 197 Shoe House Rd, Hellam, PA 17406
Status: Not listed on the market

Shoe store tycoon Mahlon Haines built this landmark home in 1948 as an advertising gimmick. The house features a front door with a stained-glass portrait of the owner himself, an observation platform, and even a shoe-shaped doghouse. Fittingly, Mahlon once used the home as a guest house, offering weekend stays to elderly couples.

Decommissioned missile site, 1874 N Batum Rd,Othello, WA
Decommissioned missile site

10. Decommissioned missile site – 1874 N Batum Rd, Othello, WA 99159
Status: For Sale – $3,500,000

We saved the best for last and no – this is not a joke. This is a decommissioned military Titan 1 missile complex that is being listed as a potential residential property and it's for sale for $3.5 million in Othello, WA (about 3 hours east of Seattle). That's the "front door" in the photo to the right, which is a two-ton hatch that leads down six flights of stairs to a network of subterranean rooms and tunnels that all connect to a 125-ft diameter "superdome" with a 65-ft ceiling. According to Windermere real estate agent Kelvin Wallin, 18 Titan 1 missile sites were built during the years 1959-1962 between Colorado and Washington state. This one has three underground missile silos that measure 160-ft deep and 40-ft wide. According to Wallin, this site can withstand and survive any nuclear blast. Twenty years ago, a man purchased this property from the government and intended to turn it into a youth camp, but he died before he could realize his dream. Enjoy your own private well, generator power, and live off the grid. Not much curb appeal, but this beauty was built to last!

Click here for more photos of these 10 amazing homes


Scott's Contracting
scottscontracting@gmail.com
http://www.stlouisrenewableenergy.blogspot.com
http://www.stlouisrenewableenergy.com
scotty@stlouisrenewableenergy.com

Indoor Air Quality-Green Desgn

Indoor Air Quality

 

For most people, terms such as “green design” and “sustainable building” conjure up images of high-performance spaces marked by ample daylight, rapidly renewable materials, water-efficient fixtures, and products made from recycled content.

But sometimes, a building that’s seemingly good for the planet isn’t good for the people occupying it. Many man-made products and materials—even those dubbed “good for the environment”—can off-gas, or release potentially harmful chemicals into a building’s indoor air, which a building’s occupants end up inhaling. These products include everything from a building’s drywall, insulation, and flooring, to its paints, furniture, and cabinetry.

Paradoxically, some high-performance green buildings may worsen the problem by trapping these pollutants inside. Energy-efficient buildings are, by design, tightly sealed to minimize fresh outdoor air exchange and conserve energy; but this can cause airborne chemicals to amass indoors. This creates a “bubble” of hazardous pollutants—some of which are “respiratory stressors, neurotoxins, carcinogens, reproductive hazards, hormone mimics, and developmental toxins,” according to a recent report by Environment and Human Health, a nonprofit organization that aims to protect humans from from environmental harm.

“Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, xylene, toluene, benzene—the list can go on and on,” says Henning Bloech, executive director of the GreenguardEnvironmental Institute, a third-party organization that certifies products and materials for low chemical emissions. “It’s possible that one, some, all, or most of these chemicals are getting into the air we breathe inside our buildings simply because of product off-gassing,” he says.

Moreover, tens of thousands of other chemicals that off-gas from everyday products have never been studied for their effects on human health, and thousands of other compounds are introduced into the marketplace every day.

When indoor air quality (IAQ) suffers, the building as a whole fails to meet the intent of sustainability, which is to minimize negative impact on both the planet and the people. Especially important is the IAQ of buildings intended for use by sensitive population groups, such as infants, children, the sick, and the elderly. In general, these groups are particularly vulnerable to short- and long-term health problems associated with chemical inhalation exposure, including headaches, nausea, nosebleeds, upper respiratory irritation, asthma, delayed cognition, reproductive disorders, and even cancer. And according to the EPA, studies show that exposure to poor IAQ can increase student and teacher absenteeism, decrease student performance, and lower student test scores.

In addition, the EPA considers IAQ a key determiner of employee productivity and attendance. Indoor air pollution, experts say, can lead to more sick days and decreased employee output. Asthma, which can be triggered by exposure to poor IAQ, accounts for over 13 million hospital, emergency room, andphysician visits each year in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and results in an average hospital stay of 3.2 days. “Sick Building Syndrome” and “Building Related Illness”—both of which can be costly for a building owner or facility manager due to worker absenteeism, loss of productivity, and occupant lawsuits—are often directly linked to indoor airborne chemical exposure resulting from off-gassing products and materials.

Fortunately, good indoor air quality isn’t difficult to achieve. In fact, it starts with controlling the source of indoor air pollution: building products and materials. Specifying low-emitting products and materials can significantly reduce the number of chemicals that off-gas into the indoor air. But, a word of caution: When selecting low-emitting products, be wary of manufacturers that make eco-friendly claims without legitimate third-party, industry-independent data to support them. Remember, too, that not all certified “green” products account for a product’s chemical emissions. For a complete listing of products that have been independently certified for low chemical emissions, check out the Greenguard Product Guide at greenguard.org. All products are searchable by sustainable credit qualifications, product category, and manufacturer.

By taking the proper steps early on, building and design professionals can help ensure the creation of healthier, greener, more sustainable indoor environments that will benefit generations to come.


Scott's Contracting
scottscontracting@gmail.com
http://www.stlouisrenewableenergy.blogspot.com
http://www.stlouisrenewableenergy.com
scotty@stlouisrenewableenergy.com

Toxic News from the Environment Defense Fund

Dear Scotts,

Risk factor: A child plays outside formaldehyde-tainted FEMA trailers.
PHOTO: Associated Press (AP)

Did you know that deadly asbestos hasn’t been banned by the U.S. government?

Help EDF close dangerous loopholes like this and protect American families from toxic chemicals.

In America, newborn babies enter the world with dozens of toxic chemicals, including fire retardants, lead and pesticides, in their blood.

I’m Richard Denison, Senior Scientist with Environmental Defense Fund’s Health program and I’ve spent most of the last 25 years working to protect children and families from dangerous chemicals in our environment — chemicals that are polluting even our newborns.

Unfortunately, U.S. laws regulating toxics are woefully inadequate. But you can help the EDF team fix these broken laws. I hope you’ll consider supporting our efforts to close loopholes that are exposing our families to toxic chemicals.

No American is safe until we win reform.

For example, in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, our government used trailers made with formaldehyde-treated plywood to house homeless victims of the storm. As you may know, formaldehyde is a chemical that causes cancer and exacerbates asthma and other respiratory ailments.

This high-formaldehyde plywood — which is imported from China — is perfectly legal for use in the U.S. But because of its toxicity, it can’t be used in countries including the EU, Japan, and even China has banned its residential use.

This is just one example of a dangerous chemical that is prevalent in our everyday environment. Asbestos, lead and fire retardants are all present in things we use daily. As is Bisphenol A — a chemical used extremely widely (in everything from food can linings to baby bottles) that has recently been linked to altered brain development, recurrent miscarriage, and increased risk of breast cancer.

But there is hope. After years of pressure from Environmental Defense Fund (and other advocates for public health protection), the U.S. Senate introduced legislation to reform our outdated toxics law — its first fundamental reform in more than three decades.

EDF will continue working hard to push for reform and ensure that dangerous chemicals are identified and restricted before widespread exposure occurs. Your support right now will help us keep the pressure on U.S. leaders to act.

EDF will also be working on the ground to deliver safer, greener products to Americans. For example, we are partnering with Walmart to evaluate everyday products like shampoo, laundry detergents and air fresheners for suspect chemicals. As Walmart incorporates these findings into its buying decisions, manufacturers who reduce or eliminate harmful chemicals from their products will have a competitive advantage over those who do not.

Fighting for protection from toxic chemicals is just one example of EDF’s commitment to working with governments, business and communities to find strong, practical solutions to environmental health problems.

We’re pleased to have you involved in our work and hope you will consider supporting our efforts.

Sincerely,

Richard Denison
Senior Scientist, EDF

Re: Toxic News from the Environment Defense Fund

On Sat, Sep 11, 2010 at 9:08 AM, Scott's Contracting <scottscontracting@gmail.com> wrote:

Environmental Defense Fund

Dear Scotts,

FEMA trailer

Risk factor: A child plays outside formaldehyde-tainted FEMA trailers.
PHOTO: Associated Press (AP)

Did you know that deadly asbestos hasn't been banned by the U.S. government?

Help EDF close dangerous loopholes like this and protect American families from toxic chemicals.

In America, newborn babies enter the world with dozens of toxic chemicals, including fire retardants, lead and pesticides, in their blood.

I'm Richard Denison, Senior Scientist with Environmental Defense Fund's Health program and I've spent most of the last 25 years working to protect children and families from dangerous chemicals in our environment — chemicals that are polluting even our newborns.

Unfortunately, U.S. laws regulating toxics are woefully inadequate. But you can help the EDF team fix these broken laws. I hope you'll consider supporting our efforts to close loopholes that are exposing our families to toxic chemicals.

No American is safe until we win reform.

For example, in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, our government used trailers made with formaldehyde-treated plywood to house homeless victims of the storm. As you may know, formaldehyde is a chemical that causes cancer and exacerbates asthma and other respiratory ailments.

This high-formaldehyde plywood — which is imported from China — is perfectly legal for use in the U.S. But because of its toxicity, it can't be used in countries including the EU, Japan, and even China has banned its residential use.

This is just one example of a dangerous chemical that is prevalent in our everyday environment. Asbestos, lead and fire retardants are all present in things we use daily. As is Bisphenol A — a chemical used extremely widely (in everything from food can linings to baby bottles) that has recently been linked to altered brain development, recurrent miscarriage, and increased risk of breast cancer.

But there is hope. After years of pressure from Environmental Defense Fund (and other advocates for public health protection), the U.S. Senate introduced legislation to reform our outdated toxics law — its first fundamental reform in more than three decades.

EDF will continue working hard to push for reform and ensure that dangerous chemicals are identified and restricted before widespread exposure occurs. Your support right now will help us keep the pressure on U.S. leaders to act.

EDF will also be working on the ground to deliver safer, greener products to Americans. For example, we are partnering with Walmart to evaluate everyday products like shampoo, laundry detergents and air fresheners for suspect chemicals. As Walmart incorporates these findings into its buying decisions, manufacturers who reduce or eliminate harmful chemicals from their products will have a competitive advantage over those who do not.

Fighting for protection from toxic chemicals is just one example of EDF's commitment to working with governments, business and communities to find strong, practical solutions to environmental health problems.

We're pleased to have you involved in our work and hope you will consider supporting our efforts.

Sincerely,

Richard Denison
Senior Scientist, EDF




Scott's Contracting
scottscontracting@gmail.com
http://www.stlouisrenewableenergy.blogspot.com
http://www.stlouisrenewableenergy.com
scotty@stlouisrenewableenergy.com


Scott's Contracting
scottscontracting@gmail.com
http://www.stlouisrenewableenergy.blogspot.com
http://www.stlouisrenewableenergy.com
scotty@stlouisrenewableenergy.com