Air Sealing a Ceiling Electrical Junction Box

CAD Design-Weatherize-Insulate-Fire Block-Electrical Junction Box

Air Sealing Ceiling Electrical Junction Box

CAD Diagram explains how to Build and Air Tight Electrical Junction Box located in most Attics

Sealing Air Leaks

Warm air leaking into your home during the summer and out of your home during the winter and can waste a lot of your energy dollars. One of the quickest dollar-saving tasks you can do is caulk, seal, and weatherstrip all seams, cracks, and openings to the outside. You can save on your heating and cooling bill by reducing the air leaks in your home.

Hint: Use Fire Rated: 5/8″Fire Rated Drywall or Sheetrock with Fire Proof Caulking to Create the Air Tight Seal

Fire Proof /Air Tight Electrical Junction Box Cover used in Attics

Tips for Sealing Air Leaks

re-posted from:http://www.energysavers.gov/tips/insulation_sealing.cfm

Pie chart shows how air escapes from a typical home: 31% floors, ceiling, walls; 15% ducts; 14% fireplace; 13% plumbing penetrations, 11% doors; 10% windows; 4% fans and vents; 2% electric outlets.How Does the Air Escape?
Air infiltrates into and out of your home through every hole and crack. About one-third of this air infiltrates through openings in your ceilings, walls, and floors.
  • First, test your home for air tightness. On a windy day, carefully hold a lit incense stick or a smoke pen next to your windows, doors, electrical boxes, plumbing fixtures, electrical outlets, ceiling fixtures, attic hatches, and other locations where there is a possible air path to the outside. If the smoke stream travels horizontally, you have located an air leak that may need caulking, sealing, or weatherstripping.
  • Caulk and weatherstrip doors and windows that leak air.
  • Caulk and seal air leaks where plumbing, ducting, or electrical wiring penetrates through walls, floors, ceilings, and soffits over cabinets.
  • Install foam gaskets behind outlet and switch plates on walls.
  • Look for dirty spots in your insulation, which often indicate holes where air leaks into and out of your house. You can seal the holes with low-expansion spray foam made for this purpose.
  • Look for dirty spots on your ceiling paint and carpet, which may indicate air leaks at interior wall/ceiling joints and wall/floor joists. These joints can be caulked.
  • Install storm windows over single-pane windows or replace them with more efficient windows, such as double-pane. See Windows on page 18 for more information.
  • When the fireplace is not in use, keep the flue damper tightly closed. A chimney is designed specifically for smoke to escape, so until you close it, warm air escapes—24 hours a day!
  • For new construction, reduce exterior wall leaks by installing house wrap, taping the joints of exterior sheathing, and comprehensively caulking and sealing the exterior walls.
  • Use foam sealant around larger gaps around windows, baseboards, and other places where warm air may be leaking out.
  • Kitchen exhaust fan covers can keep air from leaking in when the exhaust fan is not in use. The covers typically attach via magnets for ease of replacement.
  • Replacing existing door bottoms and thresholds with ones that have pliable sealing gaskets is a great way to eliminate conditioned air leaking out from underneath the doors.
  • Fireplace flues are made from metal, and over time repeated heating and cooling can cause the metal to warp or break, creating a channel for hot or cold air loss. Inflatable chimney balloons are designed to fit beneath your fireplace flue during periods of non-use. They are made from several layers of durable plastic and can be removed easily and reused hundreds of times. Should you forget to remove the balloon before making a fire, the balloon will automatically deflate within seconds of coming into contact with heat.
Cutaway house illustration showing areas of home where air leaks. Refer to caption for list.Sources of Air Leaks in Your Home
Areas that leak air into and out of your home cost you lots of money. Check the areas listed below.

  1. Dropped ceiling
  2. Recessed light
  3. Attic entrance
  4. Sill plates
  1. Water and furnace flues
  2. All ducts
  3. Door frames
  4. Chimney flashing
  1. Window frames
  2. Electrical outlets and switches
  3. Plumbing and utility access
Scotts Contracting is available to assist you in improving your Home or Business Energy Demands.  Please use this form to Contact Scotty, Scotts Contracting to schedule a FREE Energy Analysis for your Property.

4 thoughts on “Air Sealing a Ceiling Electrical Junction Box

  1. Pingback: Poll-How can I help you Save Money on your Winter-Time Heating Bills? « Scotts Contracting

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